Modern Slavery Legislation

Kiwis care about the people who make our products. Together, we’re calling for dignity and fairness for everyone, no matter where they live.


A modern slavery law for Aotearoa


No matter where we live, everyone should be safe at work, treated with dignity, and rewarded fairly. Right now, modern slavery stands in the way of those things for 50 million people around the world. And here in New Zealand – we’re connected to the problem. Many of the people stuck in slavery right now are producing products we use every day.

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50 million

people are in slavery.

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12.3 million

are children.

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59% live in Asia Pacific

a region that many of our products come from.


Right now, the government is drafting a modern slavery law.

<br>Right now, the government is drafting a modern slavery law.

Because you took action, in August 2023 the government committed to introducing a modern slavery reporting law!

In June 2022, 5,100 of you made submissions through World Vision during the government’s public consultation. The government summarised the feedback: New Zealanders overwhelmingly support a law to address modern slavery.

In 2021, 37,000 of you signed our petition calling for modern slavery law. In February 2022, the petitions committee recommended the government bring legislation before the House.

This is a great first step, but we still have work to do to ensure the government strengthens the law to require companies to take action. Join us as we continue to support accountability for business and dignity for workers everywhere.
 


Billions of dollars of New Zealand imports linked to modern slavery.

<br>Billions of dollars of New Zealand imports linked to modern slavery.

Each week, every household in New Zealand spends $77 on goods associated with child and forced labour.

Right now, there is no requirement for businesses to take action to address and reduce modern slavery in their supply chains. This ‘don’t-ask, don’t-tell’ approach means that it’s almost impossible for New Zealanders to have confidence that what we buy, and use is slavery-free.

Learn more about the risky goods New Zealand imports.

$3.6 Billion

worth of risky electronics imported in 2022.


Modern slavery can be found in almost every sector, region and industry in the world.

The High Price of Beauty: Child labour in global cosmetics


Child labour should have no place in our makeup bags, but sadly this isn’t the case. Millions of children are losing out on a safe and healthy childhood to work in dangerous or exploitative conditions, farming and mining essential ingredients for common cosmetics including lipstick, mascara, and blush.

Our latest report explores the stories behind the production of six beauty product ingredients that have a high risk of child labour in their sourcing and production: palm oil, cocoa, vanilla, shea, mica and copper.

Read the report to learn more

Most New Zealand businesses are failing to address modern slavery.

Most New Zealand businesses are failing to address modern slavery.

Most New Zealand businesses are purchasing goods at risk of modern slavery and worker exploitation.

Many businesses don’t know their products’ origins and are taking no action to address slavery risks in their supply chains.

Learn more about the modern slavery risk profile of businesses
across various industries in New Zealand.
 

What will the modern slavery reporting law do?

Under the new law, companies will be required to be transparent and annually disclose the risks of modern slavery in their supply chains and operations. The law will apply to all companies with an annual revenue over $20 million, which includes around 4000 entities in New Zealand. Reporting statements will be made available to the public in an online register, and there will be penalties if companies don’t comply.

We’re thrilled that this is a strong reporting law! Reporting is important because it means that businesses who may have never thought about modern slavery before will need to become educated on the issue and understand how it relates to their operations and supply chains.

However, we know that the law also needs due diligence to make a meaningful difference for people trapped in slavery. This is the requirement for businesses to take action to address and reduce slavery risks. The great news is the government has committed to including this in the future, but it hasn’t given a clear timeline.

With the introduction of this law, we’re one step closer to a world where Kiwis can be confident that the products lining New Zealand shelves are made by people who are treated with dignity and rewarded fairly.