FAQs

We determine the locations of our long-term projects based on the United Nations measurements of poverty. Therefore, our focus is on Africa, Asia and the Pacific, according to need. We also respond to emergencies depending on the size and scale of a disaster and whether a local government can respond adequately.
We have strong checks and balances in place to ensure it does. World Vision New Zealand does not tolerate fraud or corruption in its operations and programmes and we are committed to the highest standards of legal, ethical and moral behaviour in all we do. 

To make sure that corruption and fraud is prevented or detected in a timely manner, World Vision has implemented a number of measures including: 
  • World Vision staff – here in New Zealand and overseas – monitor and visit projects and organise audits of project finance to make certain that all funds are properly used
A management system has been set up that avoids any individual having exclusive rights to spend large amounts of money: 
  • Thorough background checks on staff are conducted
  • Local employees are trained to detect and deter fraud 
  • A whistle-blower system has been established so staff can report any suspicious behaviour  
Each project and National Office is accountable through a range of internal and external audit and programme quality review procedures. Reports are sent to the supporters who give us money and to the governments and authorities in the places where we operate, and to our industry peers. Additionally, World Vision complies with the requirements of funders such as MFAT. Our financial statements are externally and independently audited (in the same way and to the same standards which apply to New Zealand companies) and our annual reports are prepared to internationally acknowledged standards of transparency for not-for-profits.

A full copy of our latest financial statement is available by contacting our Supporter Services Team (0800 800 776) and a summary is available online. You can also read our Annual Report.
In July and August 2013, the Australian government introduced a policy that any asylum seeker arriving to Australia by boat would be sent to Nauru or Manus Island for processing. If found to be a refugee, they would be settled in a country other than Australia. The policies have received sustained criticism for their profound violations of human rights. The conditions in which the refugees and asylum seekers are living are sub-standard and they lack access to adequate healthcare, education, and protection from sexual and physical abuse.  
In 2016, more than 1,000 leaked incident reports involving children were reported by The Guardian that showed the harrowing conditions they were faced with daily. Children have grown up surrounded by fences and security guards, with few safe and child-friendly places to play. These circumstances have profound negative impacts on the mental and emotional health and growth of children. They are being robbed of a childhood and a future.