Protect Women and Children from Violence

Physical and sexual violence is the biggest issue affecting women and children in the Pacific today.

The Pacific region has some of the highest rates of violence against women and children in the world. The home is often the most dangerous place for women and children, and many live in daily fear of violence.

We are advocating for dedicated aid funding, and need your voice!

We are advocating for dedicated aid funding, and need your voice!
The New Zealand Government is an important partner of the Pacific, and has funded quality programmes to tackle violence against women and children in the past. However, only a small fraction of official development assistance goes toward ending physical and sexual violence. 

We're asking that the New Zealand Government make ending violence against women and children a specific aid priority, and scale up its support for the prevention and response to violence in the Pacific. 

Using your voice to influence decision makers can have a powerful impact on creating lasting change. Together we can make our voices heard, fill in the letter template below asking the Minister of Foreign Affairs; Mr Winston Peters, to prioritise ending violence against women and children in the Pacific.
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Why is violence against women and children an issue in the Pacific?

Why is violence against women and children an issue in the Pacific?
Recent surveys show that two out of three women in countries such as Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu have experienced violence from a partner or family member. Data on violence against children is equally alarming. 

The root causes of violence are complex but begin with the idea that women are inferior to men. Some men believe that violence is the rightful exercise of authority; it is often seen as a culturally appropriate and effective form of disciplining both women and children. 

Violence has devastating long-term effects on the lives of women and children, as well as significant social and economic costs for the Pacific as a region. Violence is a significant barrier in the fight against poverty as it limits women and children’s ability to go to school, earn a living and participate in public life.
of women in Vanuatu say that their first sexual experience was forced.*
of women in Vanuatu with no education have been sexually abused as children.*
of ever-married women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner in the Solomon Islands.*

World Vision is working to end violence in the Pacific

World Vision is working to end violence in the Pacific
World Vision advocates for the New Zealand Government to provide more dedicated funding to end physical and sexual violence in the Pacific.

Partnering with local community leaders and existing community groups to raise awareness about gender equality, non-violence and the need to protect people who have been victims of violence. As a result, we are seeing a new generation of young men who have more respect for women and understand the importance of respectful relationships that are free from violence. 

Working with support services to provide links for survivors of violence, building capacity to address issues of substance abuse and conflict, and supporting church and community leaders to refer survivors to existing services.
*Statistics on family violence are indicative only, as it is an issue that is severely under-reported making it difficult to measure. 
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