World Vision Frequently Asked Questions

World Vision Frequently Asked Questions

The following is a list of the most commonly asked questions about World Vision and the work we do. 

If you have questions that are not answered here, please feel free to contact us.

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  • Who does World Vision help?

    World Vision is a Christian aid agency and we help people on the basis of their need. This means our assistance is given regardless of race, religion or creed. We help the poorest of the poor and go where we are needed the most.

  • How do you decide who needs help?

    We determine the locations of our long-term projects based on the United Nations measurements of poverty. Therefore, our focus is on Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific, according to need. We also respond to emergencies depending on the size and scale of a disaster and whether a local government can respond adequately.

  • How much money goes overseas?

    World Vision New Zealand is committed to ensuring the highest proportion of its funds gets to those in need and we work to keep the cost of administration and marketing to a miniumum. Last year, 80.8 per cent of the money received by World Vision has gone to fund our development work overseas. If you want a breakdown of where World Vision New Zealand’s money goes, read our Annual Report.

    We are fortunate to get generous advertising rates from television, radio, print, billboard and online media which helps our marketing budget immensely. Most of our administration and marketing costs go towards enabling more financial support so that we can reach even more people in need.

  • How quickly does World Vision respond to a disaster, and what is your immediate response?

    When disaster strikes, World Vision adopts a “first-in, last-out” approach: We first respond with life-saving emergency aid, and then we stay for the long term to help families recover and rebuild.

    • Within the first couple of hours after a disaster, World Vision staff members closest to the disaster respond with reports on the level of severity and need. 
    • Within 24 to 72 hours of the disaster, our global rapid response team is on the ground, making assessments and beginning to provide emergency relief. 
    • Within 72 hours of the disaster, our pre-positioned relief supplies are loaded up, transported, and distributed from local and international warehouses. 
    • We then work to continuously distribute emergency aid and relief to residents affected by the disaster. 
    Over the following months, we work to help families stabilise by providing assistance with shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, child protection activities, healthcare, and economic opportunities. 
    Once communities are back on their feet, we work with them to help ensure that they are better prepared should another disaster strike.

    (Source http://www.worldvision.org/our-impact/disaster-relief)

  • Where does World Vision work in the Pacific? What about Samoa, Tonga, Fiji and other countries?

    World Vision works in Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste. This is where the needs are most urgent with alarming health indicators similar to countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands fall into the UN’s poorest category of countries in the world. Vanuatu is consistently ranked as the most at risk country in the world to natural disaster - in 2015 it was devastated by tropical cyclone Pam, and months later severely affected by drought from the El Nino weather pattern. Timor Leste has the highest rate of child malnutrition in the world.

    In these four countries we have vast experience and programming expertise.

  • What are the key problems in the Pacific?

    The people of Melanesia live in isolated and dispersed communities that makes access to resources and services incredibly difficult. Papua New Guinea ranks 158 on the Human Development index, the Solomon Islands 156, while New Zealand ranks 9. Vanuatu was ranked as the most at risk country to natural disaster in the world. Many communities have alarming health indicators similar to countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Other key problems include:

    • Low levels of health and nutritional knowledge leading to significant child malnutrition
    • High levels of chronic diseases
    • Limited access to health services in rural areas
    • Gender based violence and discrimination
    • Lack of hygienic sanitation and reliable water supplies
    • Geographic challenges and limited infrastructure
    • Barriers to education, particularly for women
    • Urbanisation
    • Natural disasters and climate change

  • How is World Vision responding in the Pacific?

    World Vision has over 30 years of experience in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste and Vanuatu. We work in partnership with local civic actors and government to foster accountability and to ensure long term sustainability of development. We use a long-term (10-15 years) integrated, community-driven development program model that includes strategies on health, agriculture, and water and sanitation. 

  • Where does the money for Pacific Partners go?

    World Vision works in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Timor-Leste to help isolated families and communities build the skills and resources they need to become resilient to disaster and have a more secure future.

    Single donations to The Hidden Pacific campaign will initially go to cover the urgent needs in the Hanuabada Urban Wash Project. And by joining the Pacific Partners programme with monthly donations you will be contributing to World Vision’s ongoing work in the region. You will be supporting water and sanitation projects, access to education, gender violence programmes, economic development and disaster risk reduction across the region.

    We are committed to ensuring the highest proportion of the money you donate gets to those in need. Over the last five years, an average of 79.6 per cent of the money received by World Vision has gone to fund our development work overseas.

  • How do you decide who needs help?

    We determine the locations of our long-term projects based on the United Nations measurements of poverty. Therefore, our focus is on Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific, according to need. We also respond to emergencies depending on the size and scale of a disaster and whether a local government can respond adequately.

  • What about poverty in New Zealand?

    Although there is growing poverty in New Zealand, there are also many systems and agencies to assist those in need. There is always more need in the world than we are able to deal with, and World Vision New Zealand works to assist the poorest of the poor, those who are the most vulnerable. 

    We determine the locations of our projects according to the United Nations measurements of poverty. The United Nations Multidimensional Poverty Index looks at multiple different factors including health, education, and standard of living, to determine where poverty is most extreme. While there are those who need the support of Kiwis at home, that doesn’t prevent generous New Zealanders giving to those in desperate situations abroad too. 

  • How is climate change affecting the Pacific?

    Climate change is happening, and it is affecting the poorest communities that World Vision works with, especially those in New Zealand’s Pacific backyard. We know the most vulnerable, especially children, are the most susceptible to the devastating effects of climate change and changes to their environment are already affecting their lives.

    Climate change threatens the future generations of Pacific children. Because they are still growing, children are at greatest risk of the impacts of climate change on food supply. The greatest killers of children – malnutrition, diarrhoeal disease and malaria – will increase because of climate change.

    A healthy environment is the basis for the future of children.

  • What does climate change have to do with World Vision’s work?

    Climate change is a developmental problem, not just an environmental one. Many of the countries most vulnerable to extreme weather events and a changing climate are also those least able to afford to prepare for the worst, and these are countries where World Vision works. 

    Climate change is threatening food security, agriculture, water supplies, economic development and health of the most vulnerable communities, especially children. Extreme weather conditions that are increasing as a result of climate change increase health risks to communities, especially children. Diseases including diarrhoea, leptospirosis, cholera, and typhoid are increased by exposure to contaminated water or decreased hygiene due to water shortages. These diseases have the potential to kill children.
     
    As sea levels rise climate change could cause large scale displacement of low lying regions, and affect crops and water supplies, threatening communities cultural connection with their land and their livelihood.

    World Vision is working to help build sustainable resilience around the globe, including in the Pacific, to the effects of climate change.

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