FAQs

When disaster strikes, World Vision adopts a “first-in, last-out” approach: We first respond with life-saving emergency aid, and then we stay for the long term to help families recover and rebuild. Within the first couple of hours after a disaster, World Vision staff members closest to the disaster respond with reports on the level of severity and need. 
  • Within 24 to 72 hours of the disaster, our global rapid response team is on the ground, making assessments and beginning to provide emergency relief. 
  • Within 72 hours of the disaster, our pre-positioned relief supplies are loaded up, transported, and distributed from local and international warehouses. 
We then work to continuously distribute emergency aid and relief to residents affected by the disaster. 
Over the following months, we work to help families stabilise by providing assistance with shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, child protection activities, healthcare, and economic opportunities. 
Once communities are back on their feet, we work with them to help ensure that they are better prepared should another disaster strike.
World Vision takes pride in the fact that we have been working in the world’s most dangerous places for over 30 years. When we move in to aid and rebuild a community, we’re there for the long haul. 
When you sign up to be chosen as a sponsor, your photo is sent to the community where it will be displayed at a choosing party where a child will choose you.

The photo will have your name and supporter ID number printed on it. That helps us make sure we match you and your sponsored child correctly. 

If you choose to include your family members in the photo, this gives the child a little bit more information about you. As a sponsor you will have the opportunity to connect more with your sponsored child after they have chosen you, by writing letters and emails. 
Fighting has increased since early October and this has put almost half a million people living in the area at heightened risk. There have already been civilian deaths and these people are at risk of death or injury if they don’t leave their homes. Many have already been forced from their homes elsewhere in the country, some more than once.

There are at least 1,650,000 people in need of humanitarian assistance in north-east Syria. Humanitarian work assisting them is under threat from this latest fighting. Half a million people live close to the conflict zone, near the Turkish border, and are in great danger. Many of them have already been forced from their homes and could be displaced again as Syria’s war continues.

World Vision is urging parties to the conflict to protect civilians and facilitate safe access for aid agencies. The international community, including the UN Security Council, must urge restraint and facilitate continued vital humanitarian access.