FAQs

Countries with weak healthcare systems or with large numbers of displaced people are most at risk from COVID-19 and need support from the international community with funding and healthcare expertise. 

Without support from countries with robust healthcare systems and resources, the world’s poorest people will remain at higher risk of contracting COVID-19 and outbreaks may prove especially devastating. Without that support, the disease will also be more likely to spread to more and more places. 

The COVID-19 mortality rate is likely to be higher in countries where there is a lack of hospitals and health centres and where healthcare facilities are poorly equipped with diagnostic kits, isolation facilities and intensive care and respiratory equipment. 

While higher-income countries have anywhere between 2 and 12 hospital beds per 1,000 population, in the poorest countries, there may be 1 bed per 10,000 people or less. 

The COVID-19 mortality rate is also higher among patients with pre-existing health conditions. The prevalence of TB, pneumonia, malaria, HIV and AIDS in lower-income countries and high rates of malnutrition are cause for deep concern. In addition, in many countries, medical treatment is not free. The poorest will struggle to pay for healthcare which is then likely to be refused.
 
In the developing world, there are high numbers of refugees, displaced people, and people on the move who are especially vulnerable to the virus. Sub-Saharan Africa hosts more than 26% of the world’s refugee population with over 18 million people in this region declared to be people of concern to UNHCR (UN refugee agency). Countries in Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia host very large settlements or camps of displaced people fleeing conflict and poverty. These emergencies include the Syrian conflict, displacements from South Sudan and within DR Congo, the Rohingya crisis and the Venezuela migration crisis. These populations are often living in unhygienic and overcrowded camps and settlements with limited access to medical care. Populations caught up in conflict are also on the move and difficult to reach or monitor for the virus. The risk of the virus spreading, if it gets into these vulnerable populations is very high and more robust interventions are required to help prevent this from happening. 
Climate change refers to any significant change in the state of the climate that persists for an extended period, typically decades or longer. 

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the leading scientific forum for climate analysis, tells us that planet earth is currently warming in a historically unprecedented manner. Global temperatures have risen by 0.85 degrees Celsius between 1880 and 2012 and the global amounts of snow and ice have drastically diminished. While there are multiple complex drivers, the IPCC suggests that these changes can be mainly attributed to excessive levels of human-induced greenhouse gas emission, particularly the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and the destruction of forests. Greenhouse gases collect in the atmosphere and, like a blanket, warm the surface of the earth. They are now at their highest levels in history. 

Evidence of climate change is seen in increased global average temperatures, rising sea levels, more frequent and intense storms and melting ice sheets and glaciers.
Yes, a child is now able to choose their sponsor. You can sign up to be Chosen. Whether you are chosen, or choose a child, your sponsorship will make a life-changing difference.

Learn more about Chosen.
Chosen is a new invitation to child sponsorship where a child chooses his/her sponsor.
 
The sponsor can go online and submit a photo OR sign up at an event and have their picture taken. Their name and picture are then sent to a community where World Vision works, and a child from that community will choose them as their sponsor.
 
The sponsor will receive a photo of the child holding their photo, and a letter from the child explaining why they chose them. Then, like in all child sponsorship relationships, the sponsor and child can start a friendship, getting to know each other through emails or letters. And as that child’s sponsor, they’ll help the child’s entire community and other vulnerable children build real, lasting change.